Shared Kitchen

Steamed Broccoli Recipe

Printable PDF: 
Serves: 
4
Prep Time: 
15 minutes
Cook Time: 
15 minutes
Total Time: 
30 minutes
Mess Rating: 
1 (out of 5)
Ingredients: 
1 head
Broccoli
Equipment Needed: 
1
Cutting board
1
Knife*
1
Large pot with a lid
1
Steamer basket
1
Slotted spoon
2
Pot holders
Setting Up: 
Step 1:
Set Up
Have your A.G. (Adult Guide) to preheat the oven to 400°F. Wash your hands with soap and water. Lay out your ingredients and equipment.
Step 2:
Cut the Broccoli
Wash the broccoli with water. Work with your A.G (Adult Guide) to cut the broccoli, using the cutting board and the knife, into bit-size florets. If you use the stems, dice them into small pieces.
Step 3:
Prepare the Steam
Fill the pot with about ½ inch of water. Place the steamer basket into the pot. Have your A.G. (Adult Guide) help you bring the water to a rolling boil.
Cooking Steps: 
Step 4:
Steaming the Broccoli
Put the broccoli florets in the steamer basket and the lid on the pot. Steam for about 3 – 5 minutes. The broccoli should be bright green and not completely soft all the way through. Using the pot holders, remove the full pot from the heat. Then carefully remove the steamer basket and transfer the broccoli to a serving dish, using the slotted spoon. Ask your A.G. (Adult Guide) to help you with this step.
Step 5:
Serve the Broccoli
Salt the broccoli before serving, if desired. Serve immediately. If you are not serving the broccoli immediately, “shock” the broccoli in ice water to prevent it from cooking further and maintain its bright green color. Then re-heat it when you are ready to serve it. See “Alternatives and Substitutions” below, if you are not serving the broccoli immediately and want to “shock” your broccoli.
Step 6:
Alternatives and Substitutions
How to shock your broccoli – Fill a large bowl with water and ice. Remove the broccoli from the hot steam basket, using a slotted spoon, and place it directly into a bowl of ice water bath. Once the broccoli is cold through and through you can store it until you are ready to serve. Crunchier vegetables, which are cooked less, are healthier for you because they maintain more nutrients than softer vegetables. Vegetables that are softer cook longer and lose some nutrients into the steam.